Question: What bones cover and protect vital organs?

What are two bones that protect vital organs?

The ribs form a cage that shelters the heart and lungs, and the pelvis helps protect the bladder, part of the intestines, and in women, the reproductive organs.

What do the bones protect the vital internal organs from?

Protection – the bones of the skeleton protect the internal organs and reduce the risk of injury on impact. For example, the cranium protects the brain, the ribs offer protection to the heart and lungs, the vertebrae protect the spinal cord and the pelvis offers protection to the sensitive reproductive organs.

Which bone acts as shield for soft delicate organs?

Answer: protect body organs: many soft tissues and organs are surrounded by skeletal elements. for example, the rib cage protects the heart and lungs, the skull protects the brain, the vertebrae protect the spinal cord, and the pelvis protects the delicate reproductive organs.

What bones function primarily to protect viscera?

Protection: It protects our internal organs. The skull protects the brain; the thorax (sternum, ribs and spine) protects the heart, lungs and other viscera (organs within the thorax).

What bones protect the heart lungs and liver?

Your Ribs. Your heart, lungs, and liver are all very important, and luckily you’ve got ribs to keep them safe. Ribs act like a cage of bones around your chest. It’s easy to feel the bottom of this cage by running your fingers along the sides and front of your body, a few inches below your heart.

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What are bones made of ks2?

Around 70 percent of your bones are not living tissue, but hard minerals like calcium. The outside of the bone is called the cortical bone. It’s hard, smooth, and solid. Inside the cortical bone is a porous, spongy bone material called the trabecular or concellous bone.

How does the skeleton protect the body?

Examples of bones that contain marrow are the pelvis, sternum, vertebrae and clavicle. Mineral storage – the bones themselves are made of minerals and act as a mineral store for calcium and phosphorous, which can be given up if the body requires the minerals for other functions.