What is a Section 47 child protection order?

Is a section 47 serious?

A section 47 enquiry can of course prove to be very damaging for a child, for her parents and for their mutual relationships. In particular, the lives of parents can be badly affected if and when adverse conclusions are made about the harm that they have inflicted on their child.

What is the purpose of a section 47?

The purpose of section 47 investigations is to decide whether and what type of action is required to safeguard and promote the welfare of a child who is suspected of, or likely to be, suffering significant harm.

How long does a Section 47 Enquiry take?

This is usually held within 24 hours, unless a carefully planned response is needed, in which case it should take place within 15 working days, depending on the seriousness of the case in order. The purpose of the strategy meeting is to decide whether to initiate enquiries under Section 47 of the Children Act 1989.

What is Section 47 of the Childrens Act?

Under section 47 of the Children Act 1989, where a local authority has reasonable cause to suspect that a child (who lives or is found in their area) is suffering or is likely to suffer significant harm, it has a duty to make such enquiries as it considers necessary to decide whether to take any action to safeguard or …

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What are the outcomes of a section 47?

The Section 47 Enquiry will result in one of four possible outcomes: Child protection concerns are substantiated and the child(ren) is (are) considered to be suffering, or likely to suffer, Significant Harm, in which case an Initial Child Protection Conference will be convened.

Who attends a Section 47 strategy meeting?

The police, health professionals, teachers and other relevant professionals should attend the strategy meeting and support the local authority in undertaking its enquiries. The Children’s Social Care Manager has responsibility for chairing the strategy meeting and authorising a Section 47 Enquiry.

What is the difference between section 47 and 17?

Children’s Services are expected to provide help and support to children in their area as part of a continuum: … Section 17 Children Act 1989 support for more complex needs. Action under section 47 if there is reasonable cause to suspect that a child is suffering or likely to suffer significant harm.

What happens at an initial child protection conference?

The Initial Child Protection Conference brings together family members, the child (where appropriate – see Section 8, Enabling Children’s Participation, supporters/advocates and those professionals most involved with the child and family to share information, assess risks and to formulate an agreed plan of management …

What happens after a child protection plan?

After a child protection conference, the local council will make a plan to protect your child – this is called a ‘child protection plan’. You’ll get a copy of the plan from a social worker. If the plan changes later, you should get copies of the changes.

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What is a Section 47 strategy meeting?

Strategy Meetings. A Section 47 Enquiry might also be referred to as a Child Protection enquiry, a Child Protection Investigation, or a S47. These investigations are carried out to assess if there is the risk of significant harm to a child or children.

What is a single agency section 47?

Purpose of Section 47 Enquiries

A Section 47 Enquiry is initiated to decide whether and what type of action is required to safeguard and promote the welfare of a child who is suspected of, or likely to be, suffering significant harm.

What is the difference between child in need and child protection?

A child in need plan operates under section 17 of The Children Act 1989 and doesn’t have statutory framework for the timescales of the intervention. … A child protection plan operates under section 47 of The Children Act 1989, and happens when a child is regarded to be suffering, or likely to suffer, significant harm.